Systems Engineering

With a push to utilize more of our world’s oceans to meet our water, energy, and food needs, the SEA Lab is studying how to design new ocean systems with a focus on sustainability and global security. We utilize techniques of multidisciplinary design optimization, coupled with agent-based modeling techniques to optimize systems on the individual and fleet/farm level.

 

Integrated Pumped Hydro and Reverse Osmosis Systems (IPHROS)

With the ideal head height for pumped storage hydropower and reverse osmosis both at approximately 500-700 m, co-location of these systems could reduce capital investments such as pump costs while also solving brine disposal issues for desalination. In the SEA Lab, we are developing the Integrated Pumped Hydro Reverse Osmosis system (IPHROS), to meet the energy and water needs of coastal communities around the world.

Relevant Publications:

  • M. N. Haji, S. J. Saidi, A. H. Slocum, “Evolving from a hydrocarbon to a sustainable economy: starting with a case study for Iran,” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (in review).
  • A. H. Slocum, M. N. Haji, A. Z. Trimble, M. Ferrera, and S. J. Ghaemsaidi, “Integrated Pumped Hydro Reverse Osmosis Systems,” Sustainable Energy Technologies and Assessments, 18, 80-99, 2016. [preprint] [supplementary material] [published article]. Featured on MIT News.
 
Integrated Pumped Hydro Reverse Osmosis Systems

Platform for Expanding AUV exploRation to Longer ranges (PEARL)

Ongoing in the SEA Lab, in partnership with the Engineering Systems Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the development of an autonomous floating platform as a servicing station for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) that is capable of leveraging new generation high-bandwidth low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellite constellations to relay data from AUVs back to shore in near-real-time, while harnessing solar energy to recharge AUVs at sea. Known as the Platform for Expanding AUV exploRation to Longer ranges (PEARL), the system can reduce latency of data gathered by AUVs, reduce operational costs associated with deploying and retrieving AUVs, and increase the range and endurance of AUVs. Additionally, our group is use agent-based modeling to study how the simultaneous operation of the system-of-systems of the underwater (AUVs), surface (PEARL) and space (LEO satellite constellations) assets can be scheduled to optimize the productivity of AUVs at the fleet level.

Relevant Publications:

  • M. N. Haji, J. Norheim, O. L. de Weck, A Framework for the Design of Renewably Powered Offshore AUV Servicing Platforms, Ocean Sciences Meeting, San Diego, CA, Feb 16-22, 2020. [published abstract]
  • M. N. Haji, J. Tran, J. Norheim, and O. L. de Weck “Design and Testing of AUV Docking Modules for a Renewably Powered Offshore AUV Servicing Platform,” 39th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore & Arctic Engineering 2020, Virtual, August 3-7, 2020. [preprint]  [published article]

Systems Engineering

With a push to utilize more of our world’s oceans to meet our water, energy, and food needs, the SEA Lab is studying how to design new ocean systems with a focus on sustainability and global security. We utilize techniques of multidisciplinary design optimization, coupled with agent-based modeling techniques to optimize systems on the individual and fleet/farm level.

 

Integrated Pumped Hydro and Reverse Osmosis Systems (IPHROS)

With the ideal head height for pumped storage hydropower and reverse osmosis both at approximately 500-700 m, co-location of these systems could reduce capital investments such as pump costs while also solving brine disposal issues for desalination. In the SEA Lab, we are developing the Integrated Pumped Hydro Reverse Osmosis system (IPHROS), to meet the energy and water needs of coastal communities around the world.

Relevant Publications:

  • M. N. Haji, S. J. Saidi, A. H. Slocum, “Evolving from a hydrocarbon to a sustainable economy: starting with a case study for Iran,” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (in review).
  • A. H. Slocum, M. N. Haji, A. Z. Trimble, M. Ferrera, and S. J. Ghaemsaidi, “Integrated Pumped Hydro Reverse Osmosis Systems,” Sustainable Energy Technologies and Assessments, 18, 80-99, 2016. [preprint] [supplementary material] [published article]. Featured on MIT News.
 
Integrated Pumped Hydro Reverse Osmosis Systems

Platform for Expanding AUV exploRation to Longer ranges (PEARL)

Ongoing in the SEA Lab, in partnership with the Engineering Systems Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the development of an autonomous floating platform as a servicing station for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) that is capable of leveraging new generation high-bandwidth low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellite constellations to relay data from AUVs back to shore in near-real-time, while harnessing solar energy to recharge AUVs at sea. Known as the Platform for Expanding AUV exploRation to Longer ranges (PEARL), the system can reduce latency of data gathered by AUVs, reduce operational costs associated with deploying and retrieving AUVs, and increase the range and endurance of AUVs. Additionally, our group is use agent-based modeling to study how the simultaneous operation of the system-of-systems of the underwater (AUVs), surface (PEARL) and space (LEO satellite constellations) assets can be scheduled to optimize the productivity of AUVs at the fleet level.

Relevant Publications:

  • M. N. Haji, J. Norheim, O. L. de Weck, A Framework for the Design of Renewably Powered Offshore AUV Servicing Platforms, Ocean Sciences Meeting, San Diego, CA, Feb 16-22, 2020. [published abstract]
  • M. N. Haji, J. Tran, J. Norheim, and O. L. de Weck “Design and Testing of AUV Docking Modules for a Renewably Powered Offshore AUV Servicing Platform,” 39th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore & Arctic Engineering 2020, Virtual, August 3-7, 2020. [preprint]  [published article]